Grand Central Terminal New York City

2015-01-17 at 15:21

Grand Central Terminal is a commuter (and former intercity) railroad terminal at 42nd Street and Park Avenue in Midtown Manhattan. It is the largest train station in the world by number of platforms with 44 serving 67 tracks along them. They are on two levels with 41 tracks on the upper level and 26 on the lower, though the total number of tracks along platforms and in rail yards exceeds 100. Every day, more than 750,000 people pass through Grand Central and an estimated 10,000 people come into Grand Central to have lunch – more than 3 times more people than the busiest airport in the world! Still you will not run into each other and have more space to reach the train as in the modern airports of our time. There are about 22 million visitors per year making it on of the top attractions of New York. Lots of shops and restaurants on top of that.
All levels, floors, and platforms within Grand Central can be reached by lifts or ramps. It was billed as the first great “stairless” station, a design considered necessary for train passengers with large trunks and train cases.

Main Concourse Grand Central Terminal
View inside the Main Concourse, facing west

Before the Grand Central Terminal we know was build there where 3 buildings – the Grand Central Depot, Grand Central Station and the Grand Central Terminal. In 1903 the construction of the new Terminal started and it took 10 years to build it.

Grand Central Terminal
The start of the tour with Justin Ferate, the best tour guide I ever had! Before we went to the Terminal he told us about the people in the city. Rich and poor, how the rich did show their money. How people used to take the trains at that time. The general architecture at the time and so much more. Fascinating stuff that I did not expect since it was a Grand Central Terminal tour. If you are in New York and you do not attend the free Grand Central Terminal tour every Friday at 12:30pm by Justin Ferate – I can not help you!

Grand Central Terminal
Eagle from Grand Central Station, now perched on Grand Central Terminal

Grand Central Terminal
Detail from the Vanderbilt Hall, formerly the main waiting room, now used for special exhibitions and rented for private functions.

Grand Central Terminal
The statues around the clock on Grand Central’s south face represent Mercury, Hercules and Minerva, all considered apt gods to represent the railroads with their attributes of speed, strength and intellect. At the time, this was considered the largest group of sculptures in the world, 14.6m high. The French artist Jules-Alexis Coutan was responsible for the design of the sculpture (known as “Transportation”). However, Coutan never visited the US, and the sculptures were carved by the John Donnelly company.

Grand Central Terminal

Grand Central Terminal

Grand Central Terminal Tour with Justin Ferate
Justin Ferate

Grand Central Terminal
The Vanderbilt Hall, formerly the main waiting room.

Grand Central Terminal
The Redstone missile making a guest appearance in 1957

Grand Central Terminal
High up on the ceiling mural (above the constellation Cancer) is a small hole, a legacy of a NASA promotion in 1957. With the government trying to drum up support for America’s space program as the Space Race really gathered speed, NASA brought in a rocket to draw attention to their work. A six-inch hole was punched in the ceiling to help support it. When they renovated the ceiling it was decided to keep it there as a reminder. You also see a small part of the astronomical mural on the ceiling of the main concourse, which shows the Mediterranean sky during the October to March zodiac and features 2,500 stars. The stars are slightly displaced, and the sky is actually in reverse. Officials explain that it represented God’s view. However, it seems more likely that workers had mistakenly looked at the diagram on the floor and done their work from there.

Grand Central Terminal
At the renovation a single dark patch was left above the Michael Jordan Steakhouse to remind visitors of the grime that once covered the ceiling. Spectroscopic examination revealed that it was mostly tar and nicotine from tobacco smoke.

Grand Central Terminal
For all the people who pass through Grand Central daily it makes you wonder why walking here is never a problem. While the amazing design might go largely unappreciated, many of the details make this volume of traffic possible. Mr. Ferate points out that the length of tiles throughout the terminal relate directly to the size of human arms, legs, and hands, making it easy for people to move throughout the area without collisions or other mishaps.

Grand Central Terminal

Grand Central Terminal
Detail above the door of the Graybar Building at Grand Central Terminal. This could be the rats inside the ship. Meyer Berger said : “The rat-and-hawser motif is there to symbolize a ship and, in turn, a port. The rat on the hawser, baffled by the rat-guard, is trying to get into the ship. The circle of rat heads on the side of the hawser typify the rats IN the ship.You will see some grasshoppers in the design, too, because, as in the song, ‘Grasshoppers stand upon the railroad track.’ And, too, you will see a number of albatrosses–birds of the sea–carved here and there.”

Grand Central Terminal
There are three miniature rat sculptures on the canopy’s support rods. The sculpted rats are depicted as if they are climbing the anchor ropes on a ship.

Looking up in New York City – Part 3

2015-01-16 at 16:26

The almost last the part of my New York City pictures from the 2013 Summer trip. I have one more post about Grand Central Terminal coming up. After that it is off to sunny California where it was quite cold sometimes.

Looking up in New York City

Looking up in New York City

Looking up in New York City

Looking up in New York City

Looking up in New York City

Looking up in New York City

Looking up in New York City

Looking up in New York City

Looking up in New York City

Looking up in New York City

Looking up in New York City

Looking up in New York City

Looking up in New York City

Looking up in New York City

Looking up in New York City

Looking up in New York City

Here you find Part 2 and Part 1 of Looking up in New York City – Pictures from the Side Walk.

Walking the Streets of New York City

2015-01-15 at 14:52

The first days in New York City where sunny with blue sky but cold. Than it was rainy for 2 days and then the sun came back. Temperatures went north as well so I could walk the streets and take some photos. Here a few more for you to enjoy. Do not be shy – I am happy about comments :-)

Walking the Streets of New York City
That is nor really nice

Walking the Streets of New York City
Not sure if that is correct spelling…

Looking up in New York City
Welcome to historic Little Italy!

Looking up in New York City
I want one too…

Walking the Streets of New York City

Walking the Streets of New York City
Chinatown in Brooklyn

Walking the Streets of New York City

Walking the Streets of New York City

Walking the Streets of New York City

Walking the Streets of New York City
The northern end of Chinatown in Manhattan

Walking the Streets of New York City
Brooklyn

Walking the Streets of New York City
The 23rd Regiment Armory. A historic National Guard armory building. Located at 1322 Bedford Avenue between Atlantic Avenue and Pacific Street in the Crown Heights neighborhood of Brooklyn. Built in 1891 to 1895 as an castle-like structure designed to be reminiscent of medieval military structures in Europe.
Currently, the building is used as a men’s homeless shelter under New York City’s Department of Homeless Services. That is the best looking shelter – me thinks – on the planet!
When they done renovating and I am back in the city I will pay it a visit to take a few pictures.

Walking the Streets of New York City
Lots of empty buildings and lots of space to see the sky.

Walking the Streets of New York City
Downtown – Central Park

Walking the Streets of New York City

Walking the Streets of New York City

Walking the Streets of New York City

Walking the Streets of New York City

Walking the Streets of New York City

Walking the Streets of New York City

Walking the Streets of New York City

Walking the Streets of New York City

Walking the Streets of New York City

Walking the Streets of New York City

Walking the Streets of New York City

Old Advertising in New York City

2015-01-14 at 15:39

There where a few pictures of old “billboards” painted on the walls from my last trip to New York City. So i decided to take them into a separate post. There you go:

Advertisement in New York City
Fireproof Warehouse – Day & Meyer, Murray & Young Corp – Portovault – Steel Vault Storage – Second Avenue & East 61st Street
Day & Meyer, packing, shipping and storage, was formed around 1894 by Herbert W. Day and Gustave E. Meyer. They were located downtown on 5th Ave (around 27th St.) and on W. 31st St. until around 1906. They relocated to 341 4th Ave. (southeast corner of 25th St.) in 1906 and then moved uptown to 305 E. 61st St. in 1920. And it was around this time that they merged with Murray & Young, movers, to form the present company. The company still exists today and they have a home page: Day & Meyer!

Advertisement in New York City
Harry B. Helmsley (1909 – 1997) was an American real estate billionaire whose company, Helmsley-Spear, became one of the country’s biggest property holders, owning many of New York’s most prestigious hotels.
His grandfather got him a job as office boy in a real estate firm, Dwight, Voorhis & Perry, where he showed a keen talent for the business and was made a partner. In 1938 he bought the firm, renaming it Dwight, Voorhis & Helmsley. In the first half of his career, his portfolio consisted mainly of smaller properties in less-affluent parts of New York City, though it was extensive and highly profitable.
In 1954 he bought the Lincoln Building and in 1961 the New York’s Empire State Building, then the tallest building in the world, later the Flat Iron Building. At this time he was the most influential real estate magnate in the city. You find more information on Harry Helmsley at this web site.

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Bondy Export Corporation, 40 Canal Street. Sure that is no wall painting but i did like that old school feeling. On their web site they claim: “Bondy Export Corp. is New York City’s oldest and largest destination for 220 volt appliances and electronics.” Who knows if that is true??

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Hudson Realty – I could not find the company that put it up there. There are to many with the same name.

Advertisement in New York City
Refinery Hotel New York
From their website: The 12-story neo-gothic building has been designed and redefined as a place for communal engagement as well as solitary downtime, a personable and chic oasis. Our guests appreciate decadence and flair. They are unflashy in their sophistication. A night in with classic crème caramel and Dostoevsky (or maybe Lynda LaPlante) is standard.
In the days of Coco Chanel, Ernest Hemingway or Julia Childs, the Refinery Hotel would be their second home. Make the moment where you are.
Hmmm I think I would like to try – to bad it is above my usual hotel limit by far. Check out their web site if you want to stay there.

Advertisement in New York City
This one is actually 3 different Logos in one: Lombardy Dresses, founded as Lombardy Frocks in 1930, was located here at 134 W. 37 St. between 1939 and 1966. Suzy Perette Dresses, part of the same company, was located here between 1949 and 1975. Suzy Perette was the registered trademark of Lombardy Dresses – you find it on the left. The Gigi Young logo on top – kind of hard to read now was originally Gigi Young Fashions (between 1953 and 1959). It was used between 1959 and 1966. The sign, a combination of the 3 logos, must date from approximately the first half of the 1960s.

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Could not find anything for this one

Advertisement in New York City
And this is the here and now – quite boring compared to the old ones…

Walking the Streets of New York City

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